English

Installation view, Queer Communion: Ron Athey. Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 2021. Photo: Jeff McLane/ICA LA

QUEER COMMUNION: RON ATHEY

As one of the most generative and important performance artists to emerge in the twentieth century, Athey challenges traditional limits of artistic practice—activating the body as a site of trauma, resistance, sexuality, and religious ecstacy. The artist, who has been HIV positive since the mid-1980s, explores pain, fetishism, power, and queer politics, commenting on the intersections and synergies among Christian fundamentalist religious traditions and ritual, through highly visceral performances and interventions

JORGE SATORRE: BLACK JACKET, GRAY SWEATSHIRT

Satorre connects the interior of the art center, protected by its thick defensive walls, and the exterior, a garden that runs alongside. “Most of the works included in this exhibition at CRAC Alsace were developed on site, intuitively responding to the characteristics of the space and its surroundings. The formal core of the proposal consists in connecting the interior of the building both physically and conceptually to the garden behind it”, says the artist.

Edgar Calel, Hellen Ascoli, Regina José Galindo at Radical Empathies, 2021, installation shot, Callirrhöe, Athens, 2021. Photo: Alexandra Masmanidi

RADICAL EMPATHIES

The exhibition «Radical Empathies» focuses on the intersection of feminism and ecology featuring artists from Guatemala where authoritarian regimes as well as western interventionism have brutally inscribed their politics on all bodies: human, animal, plant and celestial. These bodies, vulnerable, unstable and transient deflect fixed notions of violence and provide a space of resistance and resilience

HILOS

«Hilos» is a response to the way craft is framed within Western institutions displaying Latin American, Indigenous and Caribbean Art. Historically these works are shown within a “primitive” lens of the past, and disregard the continuous ripples of colonization that have been woven into the fabric of Latinx identity and history.

Vista de la exposición “New works for a post-worker’s world”, de Rodrigo Valenzuela, en la sala principal de la Galería Patricia Ready, Santiago de Chile, 2021. Foto cortesía del artista

RODRIGO VALENZUELA: NEW WORKS FOR A POST-WORKER’S WORLD

In their invocation of histories of labor, and of industries created by humans in order to displace themselves in the service of capital, these photographs intersect with the struggles for unionization, a longtime interest for Valenzuela. They stress the body’s worth—both single and collective—as well as that of rest and pleasure.

Iván Argote, Au Revoir (film still), 2021, 4K video, color, sound. Courtesy of the artist and Perrotin

IVÁN ARGOTE: A PLACE FOR US

For the last 15 years, Iván Argote has been investigating and creating interventions on public monuments from his home country of Colombia to his current home in France. Influenced by the 2020 global uprisings of a new generation of young social activists confronting systems of inequality, oppression, and racial hierarchy, Argote’s artistic works come through as poetic and political gestures. At Perrotin, he presents six new series that propose alternatives for contested monuments within major historic cities.

ONE YEAR OF DIGITAL EXHIBITIONS: FOUR EXPERIENCES

Since we all are possibly facing an extended period of closures due to new outbreaks, digital exhibitions continue to connect us across continents and as such they are a worthy medium to examine critically. For my overview of four shows, I draw on the concept of “mise-en-scène”, the way digital artworks are presented, as recently elaborated on by one of the major research platforms of digital art, Rhizome.

Hamlet Lavastida, Cultura Profiláctica, 2021. Installation view at Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin. Photo David Brandt. Courtesy of the artist

HAMLET LAVASTIDA: CULTURA PROFILÁCTICA

Through his personal confrontation with the cultural archives, which are not recognised as such within Cuban society, Hamlet Lavastida (b.1983 in Havana/Cuba, lives and works in Havana) creates a register and demands a critical examination of Cuban history. In doing so, he criticises the lack of education and memory work in the social system of today’s Cuba.

MARÍA BERRÍO: WAITING FOR THE NIGHT TO BLOOM

Based in Brooklyn, María Berrío (1982) grew up in Colombia. Her large-scale works, which are meticulously crafted from layers of Japanese paper, reflect on cross-cultural connections and global migration seen through the prism of her own history. «Waiting for the Night to Bloom» is the first survey of her work, on view until May 9 at the Norton Museum of Art (West Palm Beach, Florida).

Pablo José Ramírez por Alberto Galván

INDIGENOUS COSMOPOLITANISM. SEBASTIÁN CALFUQUEO INTERVIEW WITH PABLO JOSÉ RAMÍREZ

Visual artist of Mapuche origin Sebastián Calfuqueo interviews Pablo José Ramírez, Adjunct Curator of First Nations and Indigenous Art at the Tate Modern in London, to inquire about his institutional and independent work, specifically, about his project Infrasónica, a digital platform on non-western sound cultures. Ramírez talks here about the complicity between coloniality and translation as a method to observe temporalizations in the discursive formations of the indigenous from a counter-ethnographic perspective, about what he has defined as “Indigenous Cosmopolitanisms”, and about the risky impulse in some sectors of the art world in relation to the indigenous, as it continues to be anchored in superficial questions about representation and identity.