English

AGAINST THE SOCIAL STIGMA OF HIV/AIDS AND BIOPOWER. INTERVIEW WITH J. TRIANGULAR

J Triangular is an artist, activist, curator, neon poet, and videographer. Artivism united us, despite many times living in different territories. Common references, from films or underground figures, fill our encounters with passionate flashes. J inspires me to be brave and continue to seek a more just world through art, even though the questions that are asked or the positions that are taken may or will be uncomfortable. Here is our last dialogue, on the eve of the International Commemoration of the Fight against HIV/AIDS on December 1st.

THREE PROMINENT EXHIBITIONS FROM VORTIC’S OUT COLLECTIVE

As part of a collaboration between Vortic, Artishock and Artgonotlar in Istanbul, and aiming to open spaces for under-represented artists, we selected three exhibitions from the OUT Collective project that stand out for their relevance today as socio-political and gender narratives and for their curatorial approach.

IGNACIO GATICA: STONES ABOVE DIAMONDS

Gatica began this new body of work in the winter of 2020 when he traveled to Chile to renew his US visa. As the early stages of the pandemic set in, Gatica waited and watched as banks began to board up their facades. This was in the context of Chilean protests initiated by the increasing of subway fares in 2019. He photographed the banks, eventually amassing hundreds of images.

MARCEL PARDO ARIZA: AFTER TOUCH

Marcel Pardo Ariza (b. 1991, Bogotá, Colombia) is a trans visual artist and curator that explores the relationship of representation, kinship and queerness through constructed photographs, color sets and installations. Their practices celebrate the erroneous, navigate intergenerational connection, and question arbitrary paradigms while pushing against the boundaries of photography.

BORN IN FLAMES: FEMINIST FUTURES

“Born in Flames” highlights a number of artists referencing non-Western folklore and mythologies to create alternate futures. Their works are representative of how each artist is thinking about futurism––including Afro-, Asian-, Indigenous-, and Latinx-futurism, or something that emerges from those narratives.

HELLEN ASCOLI: CIEN TIERRAS

“Each weave is intimately related to the body it harnesses,” the artist writes. “Its warp is the width of my hips, its length mirrors my height, its designs are spaced by the threads I can hold in my hand… It carries memory through touch, a proximity sense. I choose to use materials that reveal vestiges of bodies that were once there.”

ANNA MARIA MAIOLINO: IN THE SKY I AM ONE AND MANY AND AS A HUMAN I AM EVERYTHING AND NOTHING

Anna Maria Maiolino (b. 1942) is one of the most significant women artists working in Brazil today. The Italian-born Brazilian artist’s first institutional solo exhibition in Switzerland, at Kunsthaus Baselland, features a selection of her early videos, films, photographs, poems, and texts, spanning a narrative arc through her artistic work and life from the 1970s to the present. She converses here with curator and Art Historian Ines Goldbach.

Installation view, Queer Communion: Ron Athey. Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 2021. Photo: Jeff McLane/ICA LA

QUEER COMMUNION: RON ATHEY

As one of the most generative and important performance artists to emerge in the twentieth century, Athey challenges traditional limits of artistic practice—activating the body as a site of trauma, resistance, sexuality, and religious ecstacy. The artist, who has been HIV positive since the mid-1980s, explores pain, fetishism, power, and queer politics, commenting on the intersections and synergies among Christian fundamentalist religious traditions and ritual, through highly visceral performances and interventions

JORGE SATORRE: BLACK JACKET, GRAY SWEATSHIRT

Satorre connects the interior of the art center, protected by its thick defensive walls, and the exterior, a garden that runs alongside. “Most of the works included in this exhibition at CRAC Alsace were developed on site, intuitively responding to the characteristics of the space and its surroundings. The formal core of the proposal consists in connecting the interior of the building both physically and conceptually to the garden behind it”, says the artist.

Edgar Calel, Hellen Ascoli, Regina José Galindo at Radical Empathies, 2021, installation shot, Callirrhöe, Athens, 2021. Photo: Alexandra Masmanidi

RADICAL EMPATHIES

The exhibition «Radical Empathies» focuses on the intersection of feminism and ecology featuring artists from Guatemala where authoritarian regimes as well as western interventionism have brutally inscribed their politics on all bodies: human, animal, plant and celestial. These bodies, vulnerable, unstable and transient deflect fixed notions of violence and provide a space of resistance and resilience