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Hamlet Lavastida, Cultura Profiláctica, 2021. Installation view at Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin. Photo David Brandt. Courtesy of the artist

HAMLET LAVASTIDA: CULTURA PROFILÁCTICA

Through his personal confrontation with the cultural archives, which are not recognised as such within Cuban society, Hamlet Lavastida (b.1983 in Havana/Cuba, lives and works in Havana) creates a register and demands a critical examination of Cuban history. In doing so, he criticises the lack of education and memory work in the social system of today’s Cuba.

MARÍA BERRÍO: WAITING FOR THE NIGHT TO BLOOM

Based in Brooklyn, María Berrío (1982) grew up in Colombia. Her large-scale works, which are meticulously crafted from layers of Japanese paper, reflect on cross-cultural connections and global migration seen through the prism of her own history. «Waiting for the Night to Bloom» is the first survey of her work, on view until May 9 at the Norton Museum of Art (West Palm Beach, Florida).

Pablo José Ramírez por Alberto Galván

INDIGENOUS COSMOPOLITANISM. SEBASTIÁN CALFUQUEO INTERVIEW WITH PABLO JOSÉ RAMÍREZ

Visual artist of Mapuche origin Sebastián Calfuqueo interviews Pablo José Ramírez, Adjunct Curator of First Nations and Indigenous Art at the Tate Modern in London, to inquire about his institutional and independent work, specifically, about his project Infrasónica, a digital platform on non-western sound cultures. Ramírez talks here about the complicity between coloniality and translation as a method to observe temporalizations in the discursive formations of the indigenous from a counter-ethnographic perspective, about what he has defined as “Indigenous Cosmopolitanisms”, and about the risky impulse in some sectors of the art world in relation to the indigenous, as it continues to be anchored in superficial questions about representation and identity.

TWO EXHIBITIONS HIGHLIGHT LATINX ARTISTS’ ABSTRACT APPROACH

Two groundbreaking exhibitions currently on view in New York assert the enduring legacy of abstraction among Latinx artists: “Latinx Abstract” at BRIC, curated by Elizabeth Ferrer, and “XX”, at the Manhattan-based LatchKey Gallery. Both exhibitions emphasize, on the one hand, a desire to push against limitations and stereotypical expectations imposed upon Latinx artists, and on the other, the need to reassess the scope and history of abstract art itself.

GUADALUPE MARAVILLA: SEVEN ANCESTRAL STOMACHS

Reflecting upon his own battle with cancer, which began in his gut, as well as that of members of his family, Maravilla examines how genetic trauma manifests in the body over generations. Throughout the many teachings Maravilla experienced in his healing process, one notion kept returning –if one cleanses properly, they will heal seven generations back and seven generations forward.

Installation view "De por vida" at Company, New York, 2021. Courtesy of the artists and Company gallery

DE POR VIDA

«De Por Vida» [For Life] brings together thirteen artists whose works portray cycles of life, death and legacy. The exhibition at Company (New York) presents Latinx artists Alina Perez, Bony Ramirez, Diana Sofia Lozano, Felipe Baeza, Frieda Toranzo Jaeger, José De Jesus Rodriguez, Oscar Nñ, Raúl de Nieves, Rose Salane, Ruben Ulises Rodriguez Montoya, Sanchez Kane, Sergio Miguel, and Troy Michie.

MURIEL HASBUN. RECORD: CULTURAL PULSES

Muriel Hasbun reframes the cultural legacy of El Salvador during the 1980s and 1990s using personal and historical archives. It imprints the rescued archive of the renowned Galería El Laberinto -an epicenter of cultural activity in El Salvador during its civil war, founded by her late mother Janine Janowski- along with her own photographic archive of the time onto the national seismographic record of El Salvador.

Patricia Fernández. L: Rhythmic Moon in January (Cascade Range), 2021, Hand-carved walnut, oil on tin, pine, second hand, quartz clock movement 6.5 x 6.5 x 1.5 in (17 x 17 x 4 cm). R: Lunar Moon in August (Cascade Range), 2020, Hand-carved walnut, oil on tin, pebble, copper, second, minute, and hour hands, quartz clock movement 12.25 x 12.75 x 1.5 in (31 x 32 x 4 cm). Courtesy CWC

PATRICIA FERNÁNDEZ: HEARTBEATS

Commonwealth and Council presents «Heartbeats», an exhibition comprising Patricia Fernández’s explorations of perception and embodiment of temporality, in a year when time felt indeterminate or elastic. Hand-carved clocks and paintings of lunar calendars manifest her continual efforts to mark time amid uncertainty and isolation, pondering systems of timekeeping and a sense of simultaneity.

MARKING TIME: ART IN THE AGE OF MASS INCARCERATION

«Marking Time: Art in the Age of Mass Incarceration» is a survey and analysis of visual art and creative practices among incarcerated artists, as well as art that responds to mass incarceration exploring the work of artists within US prisons and the centrality of incarceration to contemporary art and culture. Curated by Nicole Fleetwood, the exhibition is on view at PS1 MoMA until April 4, 2021.

TEN THESES ON THE ARTIST’S BOOK

An artist’s book has its own temporality. Its reading time is not marked by the number of words per minute that we are able to skim through. It may, for all that matters, even lack text. An artist’s book can be incomprehensible in a first, second and third reading; or it may never be fully deciphered. An artist’s book is the Sphinx without Oedipus.